A Princess Ending Physical and Gospel Poverty

The role of a teacher carries great responsibility, something Haggai leader and princess Dr. Ambassador Inonge Mbikusita-Lewanika has taken very seriously.

She has spent most of her life as a teacher — teaching not only what’s important in a secular sense but also the spiritual. She holds a master’s degree from California Polytechnic University and a doctorate from New York University that qualifies her to teach the former; the Haggai Leader Experience (HLE) in 1986 equipped her to effectively share the latter. And while her formal education leans stateside, Ambassador Lewanika hails from Zambia, born a princess in Senanga on the banks of the Zambezi River. It’s there in her home country where she serves God, working to end Gospel poverty, starting with anyone she can teach.

Ambassador Lewanika at the University of Barotseland.

As a Haggai facilitator, she partners with others who promote and teach entrepreneurship in order to empower vulnerable people groups in Zambia — including refugees — to use local resources to improve their lives. The impact of this work is felt throughout East and Southern Africa, but especially in Zambia where she’s partnered with others to establish schools for orphans and vulnerable children; work with youth to teach self-reliance through agriculture, food production, and food security; actively raise money to purchase schoolbooks for inmates in the local prison; and minister to the female inmates there through regular Bible studies.

Ambassador Lewanika visits a school to bring supplies to support orphans and other vulnerable children.

“The equipping I received from the HLE made me realize that sharing the Word of God is an urgent matter and a priority,” she says. “I knew I could be an effective leader when I was transformed enough to see every assignment, every promotion, and every position as a mission field to share the Good News; and that my real boss was the Lord.”

She also teaches upcoming politicians and potential candidates for Parliament. Through roles with UNICEF, Zambia’s Parliament, and the African Union and as Zambia’s ambassador to Washington, D.C., Brussels, Belguim, and the European Union, she’s in a unique place to reach future decision-makers in her country and around the world. This further undergirds her passion to teach God’s message any way she can.

Ambassador Lewanika at a local prison where she raised money for schoolbooks for the inmates.

Of course, this doesn’t come without challenges — even for a princess. In Zambia, she works against an intense poverty mindset that exists from living in drastic economic decline for so long. Gospel poverty is rampant, her neighbors living outside the Word of God in all aspects of life. But with the experiences she’s had, she’s willing to face it.

“I am equipping others so I can say, as Paul, ‘Follow me, as I follow Jesus.’ I want to equip others to ‘teach others what they have learned.’”

Published On: May 10th, 2022Categories: Africa0 Comments

A Princess Ending Physical and Gospel Poverty

The role of a teacher carries great responsibility, something Haggai leader and princess Dr. Ambassador Inonge Mbikusita-Lewanika has taken very seriously.

She has spent most of her life as a teacher — teaching not only what’s important in a secular sense but also the spiritual. She holds a master’s degree from California Polytechnic University and a doctorate from New York University that qualifies her to teach the former; the Haggai Leader Experience (HLE) in 1986 equipped her to effectively share the latter. And while her formal education leans stateside, Ambassador Lewanika hails from Zambia, born a princess in Senanga on the banks of the Zambezi River. It’s there in her home country where she serves God, working to end Gospel poverty, starting with anyone she can teach.

Ambassador Lewanika at the University of Barotseland.

As a Haggai facilitator, she partners with others who promote and teach entrepreneurship in order to empower vulnerable people groups in Zambia — including refugees — to use local resources to improve their lives. The impact of this work is felt throughout East and Southern Africa, but especially in Zambia where she’s partnered with others to establish schools for orphans and vulnerable children; work with youth to teach self-reliance through agriculture, food production, and food security; actively raise money to purchase schoolbooks for inmates in the local prison; and minister to the female inmates there through regular Bible studies.

Ambassador Lewanika visits a school to bring supplies to support orphans and other vulnerable children.

“The equipping I received from the HLE made me realize that sharing the Word of God is an urgent matter and a priority,” she says. “I knew I could be an effective leader when I was transformed enough to see every assignment, every promotion, and every position as a mission field to share the Good News; and that my real boss was the Lord.”

She also teaches upcoming politicians and potential candidates for Parliament. Through roles with UNICEF, Zambia’s Parliament, and the African Union and as Zambia’s ambassador to Washington, D.C., Brussels, Belguim, and the European Union, she’s in a unique place to reach future decision-makers in her country and around the world. This further undergirds her passion to teach God’s message any way she can.

Ambassador Lewanika at a local prison where she raised money for schoolbooks for the inmates.

Of course, this doesn’t come without challenges — even for a princess. In Zambia, she works against an intense poverty mindset that exists from living in drastic economic decline for so long. Gospel poverty is rampant, her neighbors living outside the Word of God in all aspects of life. But with the experiences she’s had, she’s willing to face it.

“I am equipping others so I can say, as Paul, ‘Follow me, as I follow Jesus.’ I want to equip others to ‘teach others what they have learned.’”

Published On: May 10th, 2022Categories: Africa0 Comments

A Princess Ending Physical and Gospel Poverty

The role of a teacher carries great responsibility, something Haggai leader and princess Dr. Ambassador Inonge Mbikusita-Lewanika has taken very seriously.

She has spent most of her life as a teacher — teaching not only what’s important in a secular sense but also the spiritual. She holds a master’s degree from California Polytechnic University and a doctorate from New York University that qualifies her to teach the former; the Haggai Leader Experience (HLE) in 1986 equipped her to effectively share the latter. And while her formal education leans stateside, Ambassador Lewanika hails from Zambia, born a princess in Senanga on the banks of the Zambezi River. It’s there in her home country where she serves God, working to end Gospel poverty, starting with anyone she can teach.

Ambassador Lewanika at the University of Barotseland.

As a Haggai facilitator, she partners with others who promote and teach entrepreneurship in order to empower vulnerable people groups in Zambia — including refugees — to use local resources to improve their lives. The impact of this work is felt throughout East and Southern Africa, but especially in Zambia where she’s partnered with others to establish schools for orphans and vulnerable children; work with youth to teach self-reliance through agriculture, food production, and food security; actively raise money to purchase schoolbooks for inmates in the local prison; and minister to the female inmates there through regular Bible studies.

Ambassador Lewanika visits a school to bring supplies to support orphans and other vulnerable children.

“The equipping I received from the HLE made me realize that sharing the Word of God is an urgent matter and a priority,” she says. “I knew I could be an effective leader when I was transformed enough to see every assignment, every promotion, and every position as a mission field to share the Good News; and that my real boss was the Lord.”

She also teaches upcoming politicians and potential candidates for Parliament. Through roles with UNICEF, Zambia’s Parliament, and the African Union and as Zambia’s ambassador to Washington, D.C., Brussels, Belguim, and the European Union, she’s in a unique place to reach future decision-makers in her country and around the world. This further undergirds her passion to teach God’s message any way she can.

Ambassador Lewanika at a local prison where she raised money for schoolbooks for the inmates.

Of course, this doesn’t come without challenges — even for a princess. In Zambia, she works against an intense poverty mindset that exists from living in drastic economic decline for so long. Gospel poverty is rampant, her neighbors living outside the Word of God in all aspects of life. But with the experiences she’s had, she’s willing to face it.

“I am equipping others so I can say, as Paul, ‘Follow me, as I follow Jesus.’ I want to equip others to ‘teach others what they have learned.’”

Published On: May 10th, 2022Categories: Africa0 Comments

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