Investing in Others In the Warzone

Ukrainian staff member Maia Mikhaluk provides an update from the war zone, a reflection on fear, and a story of hope.

The night is coming. But this post will be not so much about the horrors of war but more about ways to continue living, even in the midst of war.

One of the greatest cures for fear is action. I think fear feeds on inaction. It feels good these days to be busy again gathering and delivering humanitarian aid, coordinating with other volunteers, going to places where help is needed, and doing something productive. Those weeks when Kyiv was cut off from its suburbs and we spent so much time in bomb shelters were the hardest. Being able to act, to be busy, to be useful feels like getting back to life.

Maia’s husband distributes humanitarian aid to a girl in a village in Kyiv.

But even during the weeks when I spent many hours in the bomb shelter I was able to work and that really helped me stay sane, stay focused on something constructive, something that had real value. Of course, we stayed involved in our network of churches in Ukraine. But I also was able to continue working at Haggai International. On April 9 I was a part of a great virtual celebration event — the graduation of 200+ leaders from 49 countries who have gone through 12 weeks of equipping through virtual sessions to be more effective in ending Gospel poverty in their communities and nations. I had the privilege to serve in virtual sessions for women in Asia. Every virtual session was like a window into a much bigger world — with different challenges and blessings. Some participants in my sessions were also in countries with serious political and economic problems. But just like me, they are choosing to stay and help their people because it’s their home and they are leaders in their communities.

Half of those 12 weeks were war weeks for me. I am grateful that my internet connection allowed me to continue to stay involved and engaged in this transformational equipping process – it was like having a front-row seat to seeing God’s work in the lives of some amazing leaders who will be sending ripple effects in their own spheres of influence. There were many days when I had to struggle to focus. I probably would have performed my role better if it was not for war. But I am grateful my team allowed me to continue working. It was a blessing!

When you live every day as possibly your last one, you better live it doing something more meaningful than obsessing over news. Investing in others is always the best investment!

I am grateful that God gives me the opportunity to be useful locally and globally. I trust that in spite of all these difficulties God will turn it all for good for me, my family, my people, and my country — we will become stronger and more reliant on God.

Romans 8:28 says, “And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.”

Maia (third from left) with Haggai International facilitators some years ago.

Written by Maia Mikhaluk

Published On: April 14th, 2022Categories: Asia0 Comments

Investing in Others In the Warzone

Ukrainian staff member Maia Mikhaluk provides an update from the war zone, a reflection on fear, and a story of hope.

The night is coming. But this post will be not so much about the horrors of war but more about ways to continue living, even in the midst of war.

One of the greatest cures for fear is action. I think fear feeds on inaction. It feels good these days to be busy again gathering and delivering humanitarian aid, coordinating with other volunteers, going to places where help is needed, and doing something productive. Those weeks when Kyiv was cut off from its suburbs and we spent so much time in bomb shelters were the hardest. Being able to act, to be busy, to be useful feels like getting back to life.

Maia’s husband distributes humanitarian aid to a girl in a village in Kyiv.

But even during the weeks when I spent many hours in the bomb shelter I was able to work and that really helped me stay sane, stay focused on something constructive, something that had real value. Of course, we stayed involved in our network of churches in Ukraine. But I also was able to continue working at Haggai International. On April 9 I was a part of a great virtual celebration event — the graduation of 200+ leaders from 49 countries who have gone through 12 weeks of equipping through virtual sessions to be more effective in ending Gospel poverty in their communities and nations. I had the privilege to serve in virtual sessions for women in Asia. Every virtual session was like a window into a much bigger world — with different challenges and blessings. Some participants in my sessions were also in countries with serious political and economic problems. But just like me, they are choosing to stay and help their people because it’s their home and they are leaders in their communities.

Half of those 12 weeks were war weeks for me. I am grateful that my internet connection allowed me to continue to stay involved and engaged in this transformational equipping process – it was like having a front-row seat to seeing God’s work in the lives of some amazing leaders who will be sending ripple effects in their own spheres of influence. There were many days when I had to struggle to focus. I probably would have performed my role better if it was not for war. But I am grateful my team allowed me to continue working. It was a blessing!

When you live every day as possibly your last one, you better live it doing something more meaningful than obsessing over news. Investing in others is always the best investment!

I am grateful that God gives me the opportunity to be useful locally and globally. I trust that in spite of all these difficulties God will turn it all for good for me, my family, my people, and my country — we will become stronger and more reliant on God.

Romans 8:28 says, “And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.”

Maia (third from left) with Haggai International facilitators some years ago.

Written by Maia Mikhaluk

Published On: April 14th, 2022Categories: Asia0 Comments

Investing in Others In the Warzone

Ukrainian staff member Maia Mikhaluk provides an update from the war zone, a reflection on fear, and a story of hope.

The night is coming. But this post will be not so much about the horrors of war but more about ways to continue living, even in the midst of war.

One of the greatest cures for fear is action. I think fear feeds on inaction. It feels good these days to be busy again gathering and delivering humanitarian aid, coordinating with other volunteers, going to places where help is needed, and doing something productive. Those weeks when Kyiv was cut off from its suburbs and we spent so much time in bomb shelters were the hardest. Being able to act, to be busy, to be useful feels like getting back to life.

Maia’s husband distributes humanitarian aid to a girl in a village in Kyiv.

But even during the weeks when I spent many hours in the bomb shelter I was able to work and that really helped me stay sane, stay focused on something constructive, something that had real value. Of course, we stayed involved in our network of churches in Ukraine. But I also was able to continue working at Haggai International. On April 9 I was a part of a great virtual celebration event — the graduation of 200+ leaders from 49 countries who have gone through 12 weeks of equipping through virtual sessions to be more effective in ending Gospel poverty in their communities and nations. I had the privilege to serve in virtual sessions for women in Asia. Every virtual session was like a window into a much bigger world — with different challenges and blessings. Some participants in my sessions were also in countries with serious political and economic problems. But just like me, they are choosing to stay and help their people because it’s their home and they are leaders in their communities.

Half of those 12 weeks were war weeks for me. I am grateful that my internet connection allowed me to continue to stay involved and engaged in this transformational equipping process – it was like having a front-row seat to seeing God’s work in the lives of some amazing leaders who will be sending ripple effects in their own spheres of influence. There were many days when I had to struggle to focus. I probably would have performed my role better if it was not for war. But I am grateful my team allowed me to continue working. It was a blessing!

When you live every day as possibly your last one, you better live it doing something more meaningful than obsessing over news. Investing in others is always the best investment!

I am grateful that God gives me the opportunity to be useful locally and globally. I trust that in spite of all these difficulties God will turn it all for good for me, my family, my people, and my country — we will become stronger and more reliant on God.

Romans 8:28 says, “And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.”

Maia (third from left) with Haggai International facilitators some years ago.

Written by Maia Mikhaluk

Published On: April 14th, 2022Categories: Asia0 Comments

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